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Originating from within the Atlas Mountain Range in Morocco, the crystal/mineral “Selenite” is now being crafted into beautiful crystal lamps that can elegantly present another dimension to creating a peaceful and pure space.

Selenite is named after the moon goddess – Selene.  Selenite is a soft white in colour and is symbolic to both change and predictability. 

Selenite is from the gypsum mineral/crystal family.  It forms the colourless and transparent variety which displays a pearl like lustre and shimmering opaque.

The translucent selenite in these crystal lamps are sourced from the ancient sea beds in Morocco and formed through the process of evaporating salt water in clay beds and hot springs.  When lit up from inside, the lamp displays and shows off all the intricate details of this breath-taking crystal whilst producing ‘negative ions” for natural air purification. 

Selenite lamps are wonderful in creating an ambience for meditation, concentration and thought clarity.  These lamps are excellent to use whilst studying or making life changing decisions.  Positioning a selenite lamp in the family zone will instil a sense of peace and harmony to the home.  Selenite lamps have the unique ability of creating a space filled with calmness and tranquillity. 

Selenite is known as an “emotional cleanser” for the mind, body, spirit and extends through to the outer environment. 

Mind: Brings deep peace, assists in mental clarity and clears confusion

Body: Strengthens the spinal column, promotes flexibility within the skeletal system and can assist in preventing “free radical” damage

Spirit: Wonderful protective crystal that helps shield a person or space from negative outside influences

When working with selenite remember that being a form of gypsum it will melt away in water therefore, full moon cleansing is preferable.

Placing the healing information of these crystals aside these selenite lamps create a simply majestical beauty – a symbol of nature’s true treasures!

Written by Nick Kalaf — October 14, 2014